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Re: Sorry, thats Heading tags as opposed Font tags.
From Max on 08 April '98
adding to Sorry, thats Heading tags as opposed Font tags. posted by Wayne Mumford

>>Do I gain a significant advantage by writing all my text inside
>>the various tags as opposed to using to
>>vary size?
Search engines have a very strong bias in favor of
correct HTML and very structured documents. They are easier
for them to handle.
Each Heading tag indicates that the text inside has a certain
level of importance. The relative rank of structural tags is:
(outranks everything)<br><H1> ... down to <H6><br>Table Heading, if present, outranks anything in that table, including<br>any <Hx> tags (you dilute the importance of tags by <br>enclosing them in other tags - keep your headings OUT <br>of tables, lists, etc for best effect.)<br>Captions outrank <P>, and may outrank some of the headers.<br> I suspect that the <P> text following an important <Hx> would<br>outrank the <P> text following a lesser header, on<br>many search engines and may even outrank a lower ranking<br>heading.<br> I know that the first <P> after a header is more<br>important than the remaining ones. Generally speaking,<br>the closer to the top of the apge, the more important.<p> Indexing programs don't bother to read <FONT> to<br>try to figure out what your heirarchy is ... it's<br>all <P> text of the same rank to them, so they go <br>by position on the page.<br> Kluging your text to create a large first cap<br>really screws up the indexer because they view<br>the end of tag as end of word, and the word breaks.<br>Search for "etscape" some time and you'll see what I mean.<p>>>Will the engines treat a phrase such as handmade gifts that is <br>>>written as a keyword phrase the same as if it were written as <br>>>two different words? <br> I've had the best luck by using keywords as a group of<br>words, making no attempt to make phrases of them, letting<br>the various search engines figure them out.<br>Like this META tag for the fictional Granny's Garden Gnomes<br>CONTENT="garden landscape decoration pottery bronze <br>terracotta stone marble gnome gnomes statue statues sundial <br>sundials planter planters pot pots fountain fountains"<p> Of course, it's on a page with a very descriptive title<br>"Granny's Garden Gnomes and Other Landscape Decorations"<br> And precise description META - the most important<br> ad you'll ever write for that page.<br> And a <H1> that repeats some of the keywords<br> And a paragraph immediately after that, concisely <br> describing the page purpose and contents, and <br> repeating as many of the keywords as grammar <br> and syntax permit.<p>Max<P> </DL> </TD></TR></TABLE></CENTER> <CENTER><TABLE><TR><TD><HR SIZE=1><FONT SIZE=+1><B><I>Replies from other people:</I></B></FONT> <UL><!--insert: 40--> </UL><!--end: 40--> <HR SIZE=1></TD></TR></TABLE></CENTER><P> <CENTER><TABLE><TR><TD COLSPAN=2><A NAME="reply"><HR SIZE=1><FONT SIZE=+1><B><I>Reply to this message:</I></B></FONT></TD></TR> <FORM METHOD="post" ACTION="http://deadlock.com/cgi-bin/98-04.pl"> <INPUT TYPE="hidden" NAME="followup" VALUE="32,36,40"> <INPUT TYPE=hidden NAME="origname" VALUE="Max"> <INPUT TYPE=hidden NAME="origemail" VALUE="maximaniac@hotmail.com"> <INPUT TYPE=hidden NAME="origsubject" VALUE="Re: Sorry, thats Heading tags as opposed Font tags."> <INPUT TYPE=hidden NAME="origdate" VALUE="08 April '98"> <TR ALIGN=center><TD COLSPAN=2><HR SIZE=1> <I><B><FONT COLOR="#0000FF">Who Are You?</FONT></B></I><HR SIZE=1></TD></TR> <TR><TD ALIGN=right><B>Your name:</B></TD><TD><INPUT TYPE="text" NAME="name" SIZE=50></TD></TR> <TR><TD ALIGN=right><B>Email:</B></TD><TD><INPUT TYPE="text" NAME="email" SIZE=50></TD></TR> <TR><TD ALIGN=right><B>Home page title:</B><BR><FONT SIZE=-2>(optional)</FONT></TD> <TD><INPUT TYPE="text" NAME="url_title" SIZE=50></TD></TR> <TR><TD ALIGN=right><B>Home page URL:</B><BR><FONT SIZE=-2>(optional)</FONT></TD> <TD><INPUT TYPE="text" NAME="url" VALUE="http://" SIZE=50></TD></TR> <TR><TD COLSPAN=2><BR></TD></TR> <TR ALIGN=center><TD COLSPAN=2><HR SIZE=1><I><B><FONT COLOR="#0000FF">Your Reply:</FONT></B></I> <HR SIZE=1></TD></TR> <TR><TD ALIGN=right><B>Subject:</B></TD> <TD><INPUT TYPE="text" NAME="subject" VALUE="Re: Sorry, thats Heading tags as opposed Font tags." SIZE=50></TD></TR> <TR><TD ALIGN=right VALIGN=top><B>Reply:</B></TD><TD><TEXTAREA COLS=45 ROWS=10 NAME="body"> >>>Do I gain a significant advantage by writing all my text inside >>>the various <H> tags as opposed to using <font> to >>>vary size? > Search engines have a very strong bias in favor of >correct HTML and very structured documents. They are easier >for them to handle. > Each Heading tag indicates that the text inside has a certain >level of importance. The relative rank of structural tags is: ><TITLE> (outranks everything) ><H1> ... down to <H6> >Table Heading, if present, outranks anything in that table, including >any <Hx> tags (you dilute the importance of tags by >enclosing them in other tags - keep your headings OUT >of tables, lists, etc for best effect.) >Captions outrank <P>, and may outrank some of the headers. > I suspect that the <P> text following an important <Hx> would >outrank the <P> text following a lesser header, on >many search engines and may even outrank a lower ranking >heading. > I know that the first <P> after a header is more >important than the remaining ones. Generally speaking, >the closer to the top of the apge, the more important. > Indexing programs don't bother to read <FONT> to >try to figure out what your heirarchy is ... it's >all <P> text of the same rank to them, so they go >by position on the page. > Kluging your text to create a large first cap >really screws up the indexer because they view >the end of tag as end of word, and the word breaks. >Search for "etscape" some time and you'll see what I mean. >>>Will the engines treat a phrase such as handmade gifts that is >>>written as a keyword phrase the same as if it were written as >>>two different words? > I've had the best luck by using keywords as a group of >words, making no attempt to make phrases of them, letting >the various search engines figure them out. >Like this META tag for the fictional Granny's Garden Gnomes >CONTENT="garden landscape decoration pottery bronze >terracotta stone marble gnome gnomes statue statues sundial >sundials planter planters pot pots fountain fountains" > Of course, it's on a page with a very descriptive title >"Granny's Garden Gnomes and Other Landscape Decorations" > And precise description META - the most important > ad you'll ever write for that page. > And a <H1> that repeats some of the keywords > And a paragraph immediately after that, concisely > describing the page purpose and contents, and > repeating as many of the keywords as grammar > and syntax permit. >Max </TEXTAREA></TD></TR> <TR ALIGN=center><TD COLSPAN=2><HR SIZE=1> <INPUT TYPE="submit" VALUE="Post Reply"> </TD></TR> </FORM> </TABLE></CENTER> <P><BR><BR></BODY></HTML>